Basal cell carcinoma risk and solar UV exposure in occupationally relevant anatomic sites: do histological subtype, tumor localization and Fitzpatrick phototype play a role? A population-based case-control study.

Bauer A, Haufe E, Heinrich L, Seidler A, Schulze HJ, Elsner P, Drexler H, Letzel S, John SM, Fartasch M, Bruening T, Dugas-Breit S, Gina M, Weistenhöfer W, Bachmann K, Bruhn I, Lang BM, Brans R, Allam JP, Grobe W, Westerhausen S, Knuschke P, Wittlich M, Diepgen TL, Schmitt J (2020)


Publication Type: Journal article

Publication year: 2020

Journal

Book Volume: 15

Journal Issue: 1

DOI: 10.1186/s12995-020-00279-8

Abstract

Background: A two-fold risk increase to develop basal cell carcinoma was seen in outdoor workers exposed to high solar UV radiation compared to controls. However, there is an ongoing discussion whether histopathological subtype, tumor localization and Fitzpatrick phototype may influence the risk estimates. Objectives: To evaluate the influence of histological subtype, tumor localization and Fitzpatrick phototype on the risk to develop basal cell carcinoma in highly UV-exposed cases and controls compared to those with moderate or low solar UV exposure. Methods: Six hundred forty-three participants suffering from incident basal cell carcinoma in commonly sun-exposed anatomic sites (capillitium, face, lip, neck, dorsum of the hands, forearms outside, décolleté) of a population-based, case-control, multicenter study performed from 2013 to 2015 in Germany were matched to controls without skin cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted stratified for histological subtype, phototype 1/2 and 3/4. Dose-response curves adjusted for age, age2, sex, phototype and non-occupational UV exposure were calculated. Results: Participants with high versus no (OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.24-3.50; p = 0.006) or versus moderate (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.15-3.65; p = 0.015) occupational UV exposure showed a more than two-fold significantly increased risk to develop BCC in commonly UV-exposed body sites. Multivariate regression analysis did not show an influence of phototype or histological subtype on risk estimates. The restriction of the analysis to BCC cases in commonly sun-exposed body sites did not influence the risk estimates. The occupational UV dosage leading to a 2-fold increased basal cell carcinoma risk was 6126 standard erythema doses. Conclusion: The risk to develop basal cell carcinoma in highly occupationally UV-exposed skin was doubled consistently, independent of histological subtype, tumor localization and Fitzpatrick phototype.

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APA:

Bauer, A., Haufe, E., Heinrich, L., Seidler, A., Schulze, H.J., Elsner, P.,... Schmitt, J. (2020). Basal cell carcinoma risk and solar UV exposure in occupationally relevant anatomic sites: do histological subtype, tumor localization and Fitzpatrick phototype play a role? A population-based case-control study. Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 15(1). https://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12995-020-00279-8

MLA:

Bauer, A., et al. "Basal cell carcinoma risk and solar UV exposure in occupationally relevant anatomic sites: do histological subtype, tumor localization and Fitzpatrick phototype play a role? A population-based case-control study." Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology 15.1 (2020).

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