Conference contribution


Non-homeostatic intake of snack foods: Molecular triggers and effects on brain activity pattern


Publication Details
Author(s): Hoch T, Heß A, Pischetsrieder M
Publisher: ACS
Publishing place: Washington, DC
Publication year: 2015
Volume: 1191
Conference Proceedings Title: The Chemical Sensory Informatics of Food: Measurement, Analysis, Integration
Pages range: 119-131
ISBN: 9780841230699
Event: Neuroscience 2014
Event location: Washington, DC

Abstract

Craving for special types of food like snack food can tremendously influence our energy balance. The result: obesity due to a non-homeostatic, hedonic food intake, i.e. an intake of energy independent of hunger and satiety. The intake of potato chips – an often craved highly palatable snack food – has a great influence on whole brain activity pattern. Especially the reward system as well as circuits regulating food intake, sleep and locomotor activity are affected. Furthermore, we could show that the fat and carbohydrate content is a main contributor to the palatability of potato chips. These first steps of the identification of the molecular triggers and the corresponding effects on brain activity pattern of the non-homeostatic intake of highly palatable snack food are reviewed in this chapter.



How to cite
APA: Hoch, T., Heß, A., & Pischetsrieder, M. (2015). Non-homeostatic intake of snack foods: Molecular triggers and effects on brain activity pattern. In The Chemical Sensory Informatics of Food: Measurement, Analysis, Integration (pp. 119-131). Washington, DC: Washington, DC: ACS.

MLA: Hoch, Tobias, Andreas Heß, and Monika Pischetsrieder. "Non-homeostatic intake of snack foods: Molecular triggers and effects on brain activity pattern." Proceedings of the Neuroscience 2014, Washington, DC Washington, DC: ACS, 2015. 119-131.

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