Journal article
(Review article)


Chemical and physiological relevance of glucose degradation products in peritoneal dialysis


Publication Details
Author(s): Mittelmaier S, Niwa T, Pischetsrieder M
Publisher: WB Saunders
Publication year: 2012
Volume: 22
Journal issue: 1
Pages range: 181-185
ISSN: 1051-2276

Abstract

Fibrosis and vascular sclerosis are main complications that limit the long-term application of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Low biocompatibility has been largely attributed to the presence of glucose degradation products (GDPs), which are formed during the heat sterilization of PD fluids. GDPs readily modify proteins in the peritoneum, leading to a decline of their biological function. After absorption, GDPs can also promote systemic protein glycation. Additionally, GDPs may augment DNA glycation, a process enhanced in uremia. Apart from their glycating activity, GDPs induce cytotoxicity and interfere with cell signaling in peritoneal mesothelial cells. Targeted screening revealed the nature of the6major GDPs with α-dicarbonyl structure as 3-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxygalactosone, glucosone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3,4-dideoxyglucosone-3-ene. Valid quantification of these GDPs was achieved by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detector/tandem mass spectrometry. Identification and quantification of single GDPs allow a structure-dependent risk evaluation. As a consequence, PD fluids and processes can be improved to reduce the GDP burden of patients undergoing PD. © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc.



How to cite
APA: Mittelmaier, S., Niwa, T., & Pischetsrieder, M. (2012). Chemical and physiological relevance of glucose degradation products in peritoneal dialysis. Journal of Renal Nutrition, 22(1), 181-185. https://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2011.10.014

MLA: Mittelmaier, Stefan, Toshimitsu Niwa, and Monika Pischetsrieder. "Chemical and physiological relevance of glucose degradation products in peritoneal dialysis." Journal of Renal Nutrition 22.1 (2012): 181-185.

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