Implicit need for achievement predicts attenuated cortisol responses to difficult tasks

Journal article
(Original article)


Publication Details

Author(s): Schultheiss O, Wiemers U, Wolf OT
Journal: Journal of research in personality
Publisher: Elsevier
Publication year: 2014
Volume: 48
Journal issue: 1
Pages range: 84-92
ISSN: 0092-6566
Language: English


Abstract


The present research tested the hypothesis that the implicit need for achievement (n Achievement) predicts attenuated cortisol (C) responses to difficult tasks, because it represents a propensity to view difficulty as a cue to mastery reward. In two studies, n Achievement was assessed through content-coding of imaginative stories and salivary C was assessed both at baseline and post-task. In Study 1 (N= 108 US students), n Achievement predicted an attenuated C response to a one-on-one competition in the laboratory, regardless of whether participants won or lost. In Study 2 (N= 62 German students), n Achievement predicted an attenuated C response to the Trier Social Stress Test (Kirschbaum, Pirke, & Hellhammer, 1993), but not to a non-stressful control task. In Study 2 only, the attenuating effect of n Achievement was moderated by gender, with only men showing the effect. Across both studies, the average effect size of the association between n Achievement and C responses to difficult tasks was r= -28. These findings point to a role of n Achievement in emotion regulation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.



FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Schultheiss, Oliver Prof. Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine Psychologie (Motivation, Emotion und Lernen)


External institutions
Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB)


How to cite

APA:
Schultheiss, O., Wiemers, U., & Wolf, O.T. (2014). Implicit need for achievement predicts attenuated cortisol responses to difficult tasks. Journal of research in personality, 48(1), 84-92. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2013.10.004

MLA:
Schultheiss, Oliver, Uta Wiemers, and Oliver T. Wolf. "Implicit need for achievement predicts attenuated cortisol responses to difficult tasks." Journal of research in personality 48.1 (2014): 84-92.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2018-08-08 at 02:09