Incised valley fill sandstone bodies in Upper Carboniferous fluvio-deltaic strata: recognition and reservoir characterization of Southern North Sea analogues.

Beitrag in einem Sammelwerk
(Originalarbeit)


Details zur Publikation

Autorinnen und Autoren: Hampson G, Elliott T, Flint S, Stollhofen H
Herausgeber: Fleets, A.J. and Boldy, S.A.R.
Titel Sammelwerk: Petroleum Geology of Northwest Europe: Proceed. 5th Conf.
Verlagsort: London
Jahr der Veröffentlichung: 1999
Seitenbereich: 771-788
ISSN: 2047-9921
Sprache: Englisch


Abstract


Multistorey fluvial sandstone bodies in Upper Carboniferous fluvio-deltaic strata are proven reservoirs in the Southern North Sea. Several of these bodies have been interpreted as incised valley fills. Analogous valley fill sandstone bodies have been studied in outcrop and subsurface datasets from Upper Carboniferous successions in the onshore UK and Germany. Using techniques and tools applicable to Southern North Sea datasets, we review the diagnostic criteria of these valley fills: (1) stratigraphic context, characterized by deep erosion into underlying strata, lateral correlation to an interfluve surface and intimate association with an initial flooding surface in overlying strata; (2) basinward facies shift at the base of the sandstone body; (3) erosion of underlying time markers; and (4) distinctive internal architecture, which reflects increasing accommodation space during valley filling. Several features of onshore valley fill sandstones have been characterized in order to constrain the properties of analogous valley fill reservoirs in the Southern North Sea. (1) Valley geometry and extent. Studied onshore valley fills generally have a uniform thickness of 20-25 m, thickening locally to 30-45 m, and widths of 5-25 km. A small number of valley fills, associated with turbidite-fronted deltas, thicken to 50-80m in the 2-5 km adjacent to their mouths. Sheet-like fluvial sandstones overlying sequence boundaries have thicknesses comparable to conventional valley fills, but exceed 35-70 km in width. (2) Valley connectivity; typically, valley fills occur as discrete sandstone bodies, but they may amalgamate laterally, to form sheet-like sandstones, and vertically, producing thick (up to 200 m) sand-prone stratigraphic packages. The internal geometry of these sand-prone packages is complex. (3) Valley fill character. Valley fills generally lack an overall fining-upwards trend and are dominated by coarse- to medium-grained sandstone of low-sinuosity (braided?) fluvial facies throughout. Where present, fine-grained facies are preferentially preserved in the upper part of a valley fill. (4) Detrital mineralogy and provenance. At least some valley fill sandstones exhibit a different composition and provenance to surrounding strata. Such valley fill sandstones are likely to be anomalously feldspathic in the Southern North Sea. © Petroleum Geology '86 Ltd. Published by the Geological Society, London.



FAU-Autorinnen und Autoren / FAU-Herausgeberinnen und Herausgeber

Stollhofen, Harald Prof. Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Geologie (Exogene Dynamik)


Einrichtungen weiterer Autorinnen und Autoren

The University of Liverpool


Zitierweisen

APA:
Hampson, G., Elliott, T., Flint, S., & Stollhofen, H. (1999). Incised valley fill sandstone bodies in Upper Carboniferous fluvio-deltaic strata: recognition and reservoir characterization of Southern North Sea analogues. In Fleets, A.J. and Boldy, S.A.R. (Eds.), Petroleum Geology of Northwest Europe: Proceed. 5th Conf. (pp. 771-788). London.

MLA:
Hampson, Gary, et al. "Incised valley fill sandstone bodies in Upper Carboniferous fluvio-deltaic strata: recognition and reservoir characterization of Southern North Sea analogues." Petroleum Geology of Northwest Europe: Proceed. 5th Conf. Ed. Fleets, A.J. and Boldy, S.A.R., London, 1999. 771-788.

BibTeX: 

Zuletzt aktualisiert 2018-09-08 um 23:39