Quotations from 17th and 18th Century Medical Case Reports

Article in Edited Volumes
(Original article)


Publication Details

Author(s): Lindner B
Editor(s): v. Arendholz, Jenny / Bublitz, Wolfram / Kirner-Ludwig, Monika
Title edited volumes: The Pragmatics of Quoting Now and Then
Publisher: De Gruyter
Publishing place: Berlin/New York
Publication year: 2015
Title of series: Topics in English Linguistics
Volume: 89
Pages range: 401-418
ISBN: ISBN 978-3-11-042756-1
Language: English


Abstract


As recent research shows, 29 % of quotations featured in modern surgical

publications are inaccurately quoted, and it is estimated that misquotation

in medical literature amounts to 17 % of all quotes (Regier 2010). This is remarkable

since quotation is one of the characteristic and often defining features of

scientific texts (Jakobs 1999, Gläser 1990). However, to the best of this author’s

knowledge, the historical development of quoting in medical contexts has not

been investigated at the time of writing, either in linguistics or in the philosophy

of language. This diachronic study describes some aspects of the development

of quotation forms and functions in Early Modern German scientific medical literature

and investigates to what extent modern expectations on quotation can

be applied to historical scientific medical literature. The focus is on medical case

studies which came into use towards the end of the 17th century. The results are

heterogeneous: different forms of quotation were used and the way in which they

were reproduced varied, but all in all most medical authors preferred reported

speech. It is only when physicians quoted colleagues that varying forms of quotation

were utilized, direct speech and reported speech. In general, quotation was

not as common in the 17th century as it was in the 18th century, nor was it an

obligatory feature of case reports. It may become evident through the discussion

of the data that quotation customs only begin to meet modern expectations by

the end of the first half of the 18th century, as standard conventions of scientific

presentation were not well established prior to this.



FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Lindner, Bettina
Lehrstuhl für Germanistische Sprachwissenschaft


Research Fields

Weitere Forschung am Lehrstuhl
Lehrstuhl für Germanistische Sprachwissenschaft


How to cite

APA:
Lindner, B. (2015). Quotations from 17th and 18th Century Medical Case Reports. In v. Arendholz, Jenny / Bublitz, Wolfram / Kirner-Ludwig, Monika (Eds.), The Pragmatics of Quoting Now and Then (pp. 401-418). Berlin/New York: De Gruyter.

MLA:
Lindner, Bettina. "Quotations from 17th and 18th Century Medical Case Reports." The Pragmatics of Quoting Now and Then Ed. v. Arendholz, Jenny / Bublitz, Wolfram / Kirner-Ludwig, Monika, Berlin/New York: De Gruyter, 2015. 401-418.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2018-10-08 at 00:55