Mental disorder comorbidity and suicidal thoughts and behaviors in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys International College Student initiative

Journal article


Publication Details

Author(s): Auerbach RP, Mortier P, Bruffaerts R, Alonso J, Benjet C, Cuijpers P, Demyttenaere K, Ebert D, Green JG, Hasking P, Lee S, Lochner C, McLafferty M, Nock MK, Petukhova MV, Pinder-Amaker S, Rosellini AJ, Sampson NA, Vilagut G, Zaslavsky AM, Kessler RC
Journal: International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research
Publication year: 2019
Volume: 28
Journal issue: 2
ISSN: 1049-8931


Abstract

Objectives: Comorbidity is a common feature of mental disorders. However, needs assessment surveys focus largely on individual disorders rather than on comorbidity even though the latter is more important for predicting suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In the current report, we take a step beyond this conventional approach by presenting data on the prevalence and correlates (sociodemographic factors, college-related factors, and suicidal thoughts and behaviors) of the main multivariate profiles of common comorbid Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV disorders among students participating in the first phase of the World Health Organization World Mental Health International College Student initiative. Method: A web-based mental health survey was administered to first year students in 19 colleges across eight countries (Australia, Belgium, Germany, Mexico, Northern Ireland, South Africa, Spain, United States; 45.5% pooled response rate) to screen for seven common DSM-IV mental disorders: major depression, mania/hypomania, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol use disorder, and drug use disorder. We focus on the 14,348 respondents who provided complete data; 38.4% screened positive for at least one 12-month disorder. Results: Multivariate disorder profiles were detected using latent class analysis (LCA). The least common class (C1; 1.9% of students) was made up of students with high comorbidity (four or more disorders, the majority including mania/hypomania). The remaining 12-month cases had profiles of internalizing–externalizing comorbidity (C2; 5.8%), internalizing comorbidity (C3; 14.6%), and pure disorders (C4; 16.1%). The 1.9% of students in C1 had much higher prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors than other students. Specifically, 15.4% of students in C1 made a suicide attempt in the 12 months before the survey compared with 1.3–2.6% of students with disorders in C2–4, 0.2% of students with lifetime disorders but no 12-month disorders (C5), and 0.1% of students with no lifetime disorders (C6). Conclusions: In line with prior research, comorbid mental disorders were common; however, sociodemographic correlates of LCA profiles were modest. The high level of comorbidity underscores the need to develop and test transdiagnostic approaches for treatment in college students.


FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Ebert, David Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie


External institutions with authors

Boston University
Columbia University
Curtin University
Harvard University
McLean Hospital
National Institute of Psychiatry Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF)
University Hospital Leuven (UZ) / Universitaire ziekenhuizen Leuven
University of Stellenbosch / Universiteit van Stellenbosch
University of Ulster
Veterans Affairs Healthcare System Boston and Harvard Medical School
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) / University Amsterdam


How to cite

APA:
Auerbach, R.P., Mortier, P., Bruffaerts, R., Alonso, J., Benjet, C., Cuijpers, P.,... Kessler, R.C. (2019). Mental disorder comorbidity and suicidal thoughts and behaviors in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys International College Student initiative. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 28(2). https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mpr.1752

MLA:
Auerbach, Randy P., et al. "Mental disorder comorbidity and suicidal thoughts and behaviors in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys International College Student initiative." International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research 28.2 (2019).

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2019-28-05 at 19:08

Share link