Sasanian trade networks and the Silk Road – a case study on Gird-i Qilirkh in the Sharezur valley

Article in Edited Volumes
(Original article)


Publication Details

Author(s): Tamm A, Haddad L
Editor(s): Bradosty Z, Zibare A, Abdulrahmen H A, Aziz M O
Title edited volumes: Proceedings of the 3rd International Scientific conference Archaeology and Heritage of Kurdistan, April 29th & 30th, 2019 Erbil
Publisher: Salahaddin University Erbil
Publishing place: Erbil
Publication year: 2019
Pages range: 756-796
Language: English


Abstract





















This paper focuses on evidence of trade
networks during the Sasanian period in northeastern Mesopotamia. In recent
years various excavations conducted in the Kurdistan Regional Government of
Northern Iraq yielded layers of the Sasanian period. The Sharizor valley seems
to have had an important role as transitional area between the Iranian
highlands and the northern Mesopotamian plains. In Bakr Awa some seals of
Sasanian origin were found, indicating connections to the administrative
centers in central Iraq and the highlands. With a big spring nearby, Kazhaw
probably was a favored waypoint on the routes linking both regions. The remains
of a church and some stamped sherds give us direct hints to the participation of
christian communities into trade networks in the Late Sasanian era.
Additionally a small fortress in Kazhaw shows the ambitions of the Sasanian
state, not only to secure profitable trade routes, but most probably also to
take profits through taxes and the like. Especially the excavation at Qalrakh with
remains of a loom attest that the local community was not only integrated into
trade, but also was producing trade goods themselves. Some sealings from the
same context show a unique mixture of Roman style combined with Sasanian
motives, indicating supra-regional connections as far as the Roman dominated
sphere of the Near East. The finds in these settlements thus point to the
integration into regional networks, which also includes other sites in the direct
vicinity of the Sharizor valley – e.g. Bazyan, Sitak, Rostam and Merquly – but
also to far reaching trade connections along the silk roads, linking large
parts of the known Late Antique world.

 



 



 


FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Tamm, Alexander
Lehrstuhl für Christliche Archäologie


External institutions with authors

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main


Research Fields

Die materielle Kultur des Frühen Christentums jenseits der Grenzen des Römischen Reiches
Lehrstuhl für Christliche Archäologie


How to cite

APA:
Tamm, A., & Haddad, L. (2019). Sasanian trade networks and the Silk Road – a case study on Gird-i Qilirkh in the Sharezur valley. In Bradosty Z, Zibare A, Abdulrahmen H A, Aziz M O (Eds.), Proceedings of the 3rd International Scientific conference Archaeology and Heritage of Kurdistan, April 29th & 30th, 2019 Erbil. (pp. 756-796). Erbil: Salahaddin University Erbil.

MLA:
Tamm, Alexander, and Lanah Haddad. "Sasanian trade networks and the Silk Road – a case study on Gird-i Qilirkh in the Sharezur valley." Proceedings of the 3rd International Scientific conference Archaeology and Heritage of Kurdistan, April 29th & 30th, 2019 Erbil. Ed. Bradosty Z, Zibare A, Abdulrahmen H A, Aziz M O, Erbil: Salahaddin University Erbil, 2019. 756-796.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2019-22-05 at 15:34