Do guided internet-based interventions result in clinically relevant changes for patients with depression? An individual participant data meta-analysis.

Journal article
(Review article)


Publication Details

Author(s): Karyotaki E, Ebert D, Donkin L, Riper H, Twisk J, Burger S, Rozental A, Lange A, Williams AD, Zarski AC, Geraedts A, Van Straten A, Kleiboer A, Meyer B, Ince BBU, Buntrock C, Lehr D, Snoek FJ, Andrews G, Andersson G, Choi I, Ruwaard J, Klein JP, Newby JM, Schroder J, Laferton J, Van Bastelaar K, Imamura K, Vernmark K, Boss L, Sheeber LB, Kivi M, Berking M, Tito N, Carlbring P, Johansson R, Kenter R, Perini S, Moritz S, Nobis S, Berger T, Kaldo V, Forsell Y, Lindefors N, Kraepelien M, Bjorkelund C, Kawakami N, Cuijpers P
Journal: Clinical Psychology Review
Publication year: 2018
Volume: 63
Pages range: 80-92
ISSN: 0272-7358


Abstract

Little is known about clinically relevant changes in guided Internet-based interventions for depression. Moreover, methodological and power limitations preclude the identification of patients' groups that may benefit more from these interventions. This study aimed to investigate response rates, remission rates, and their moderators in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of guided Internet-based interventions for adult depression to control groups using an individual patient data meta-analysis approach. Literature searches in PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library resulted in 13,384 abstracts from database inception to January 1, 2016. Twenty-four RCTs (4889 participants) comparing a guided Internet-based intervention with a control group contributed data to the analysis. Missing data were multiply imputed. To examine treatment outcome on response and remission, mixed-effects models with participants nested within studies were used. Response and remission rates were calculated using the Reliable Change Index. The intervention group obtained significantly higher response rates (OR = 2.49, 95% CI 2.17-2.85) and remission rates compared to controls (OR = 2.41, 95% CI 2.07-2.79). The moderator analysis indicated that older participants (OR = 1.01) and native-born participants (1.66) were more likely to respond to treatment compared to younger participants and ethnic minorities respectively. Age (OR = 1.01) and ethnicity (1.73) also moderated the effects of treatment on remission.Moreover, adults with more severe depressive symptoms at baseline were more likely to remit after receiving internet-based treatment (OR = 1.19). Guided Internet-based interventions lead to substantial positive treatment effects on treatment response and remission at post-treatment. Thus, such interventions may complement existing services for depression and potentially reduce the gap between the need and provision of evidence-based treatments.


FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Berking, Matthias Prof. Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie
Buntrock, Claudia
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie
Ebert, David Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie
Laferton, Johannes Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie
Zarski, Anna-Carlotta Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie


External institutions with authors

Gaia AG
HumanTotalCare
Karolinska Institute
Leuphana Universität Lüneburg
Linköping University
Macquarie University
Middle East Technical University (METU) / Orta Doğu Teknik Üniversitesi
Oregon Research Institute
Stockholm University / Stockholms universitet
St Vincent's Hospital
Universität Bern
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE)
Universität zu Lübeck
Universiteit Utrecht (UU) / Utrecht University
University College London (UCL)
University of Amsterdam
University of Bergen / Universitetet i Bergen
University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs universitet
University of New South Wales (UNSW)
University of Sydney
University of Tokyo
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) / University Amsterdam


How to cite

APA:
Karyotaki, E., Ebert, D., Donkin, L., Riper, H., Twisk, J., Burger, S.,... Cuijpers, P. (2018). Do guided internet-based interventions result in clinically relevant changes for patients with depression? An individual participant data meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 63, 80-92. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2018.06.007

MLA:
Karyotaki, Eirini, et al. "Do guided internet-based interventions result in clinically relevant changes for patients with depression? An individual participant data meta-analysis." Clinical Psychology Review 63 (2018): 80-92.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2019-18-07 at 07:35