Can we predict cognitive decline after initial diagnosis of multiple sclerosis? Results from the German National early MS cohort (KKNMS)

Journal article


Publication Details

Author(s): Johnen A, Buerkner PC, Landmeyer NC, Ambrosius B, Calabrese P, Motte J, Hessler N, Antony G, Koenig IR, Klotz L, Hoshi MM, Aly L, Groppa S, Luessi F, Paul F, Tackenberg B, Bergh FT, Kuempfel T, Tumani H, Stangel M, Weber F, Bayas A, Wildemann B, Heesen C, Zettl UK, Zipp F, Hemmer B, Meuth SG, Gold R, Wiendl H, Salmen A, Demir S, Schroeder C, Voithenleitner LA, Berthele A, Haars S, Nischwitz S, Knop MJ, Rothacher S, Poettgen J, Warnke C, Linker R, Ziemann U
Journal: Journal of Neurology
Publication year: 2019
Volume: 266
Journal issue: 2
ISSN: 0340-5354


Abstract

BackgroundCognitive impairment (CI) affects approximately one-third of the patients with early multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). Little is known about factors predicting CI and progression after initial diagnosis.MethodsNeuropsychological screening data from baseline and 1-year follow-up of a prospective multicenter cohort study (NationMS) involving 1123 patients with newly diagnosed MS or CIS were analyzed. Employing linear multilevel models, we investigated whether demographic, clinical and conventional MRI markers at baseline were predictive for CI and longitudinal cognitive changes.ResultsAt baseline, 22% of patients had CI (impairment in 2 cognitive domains) with highest frequencies and severity in processing speed and executive functions. Demographics (fewer years of academic education, higher age, male sex), clinical (EDSS, depressive symptoms) but no conventional MRI characteristics were linked to baseline CI. At follow-up, only 14% of patients showed CI suggesting effects of retesting. Neither baseline characteristics nor initiation of treatment between baseline and follow-up was able to predict cognitive changes within the follow-up period of 1 year.ConclusionsIdentification of risk factors for short-term cognitive change in newly diagnosed MS or CIS is insufficient using only demographic, clinical and conventional MRI data. Change-sensitive, re-test reliable cognitive tests and more sophisticated predictors need to be employed in future clinical trials and cohort studies of early-stage MS to improve prediction.


FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Linker, Ralf PD Dr.
Neurologische Klinik


External institutions with authors

Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Klinikum Augsburg
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU)
Max-Planck-Institut für Psychiatrie (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Psychiatrie)
Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH) / Hannover Medical School
Philipps-Universität Marburg
Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB)
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Technische Universität München (TUM)
Universität Basel
Universität Leipzig
Universität Rostock
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE)
Universität Ulm
Universität zu Lübeck
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität (WWU) Münster


How to cite

APA:
Johnen, A., Buerkner, P.-C., Landmeyer, N.C., Ambrosius, B., Calabrese, P., Motte, J.,... Ziemann, U. (2019). Can we predict cognitive decline after initial diagnosis of multiple sclerosis? Results from the German National early MS cohort (KKNMS). Journal of Neurology, 266(2). https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-018-9142-y

MLA:
Johnen, Andreas, et al. "Can we predict cognitive decline after initial diagnosis of multiple sclerosis? Results from the German National early MS cohort (KKNMS)." Journal of Neurology 266.2 (2019).

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2019-28-03 at 09:08