Greedy elites and poor lambs: How young Europeans remember the Great War.

Journal article
(Original article)


Publication Details

Author(s): Bouchat P, Licata L, Rosoux V, Allesch C, Bruckmüller S, Klein O
Journal: Journal of Social and Political Psychology
Publication year: 2019
Volume: 7
Journal issue: 1
Pages range: 52-75
ISSN: 2195-3325
Language: English


Abstract

The present study examines current social representations
associated with the origins of the Great War, a major event that has
profoundly affected Europe. A survey conducted in 20 European countries
(N = 1906 students in social sciences) shows a high consensus: The
outbreak of the war is attributed to the warring nations’ leaders while
the responsibility of the populations is minimized. Building on the
concept of social representation of history (Liu & Hilton, 2005), we
suggest that the social representations of the Great War fulfill social
psychological functions in contemporary Europe. We suggest that WWI may
function as a charter for European integration. Their content also
suggests a desire to distinguish a positively valued ingroup ("the
people") from powerful elites, construed as an outgroup.


FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Bruckmüller, Susanne Prof. Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Sozialpsychologie mit Schwerpunkt Gender und Diversity


How to cite

APA:
Bouchat, P., Licata, L., Rosoux, V., Allesch, C., Bruckmüller, S., & Klein, O. (2019). Greedy elites and poor lambs: How young Europeans remember the Great War. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 7(1), 52-75. https://dx.doi.org/10.5964/jspp.v7i1.781

MLA:
Bouchat, P, et al. "Greedy elites and poor lambs: How young Europeans remember the Great War." Journal of Social and Political Psychology 7.1 (2019): 52-75.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2019-18-02 at 11:38