The affective response to health-related information and its relationship to health anxiety: An ambulatory approach

Journal article
(other)


Publication Details

Author(s): Jasper F, Hiller W, Berking M, Rommel T, Witthofft M
Journal: Cognition & Emotion
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press): STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles / Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)
Publication year: 2015
Volume: 29
Journal issue: 4
Pages range: 714-722
ISSN: 0269-9931
Language: English


Abstract


Affective reactions to health-related information play a central role in health anxiety. Therefore, using ambulatory assessment, we analysed the time course of negative affect in a control group (CG, n = 60) which only rated their negative affect and an experimental group (EG, n = 97) which also rated the presence of somatic symptoms (e.g., back pain). By means of mixed regression models, we observed a decline of negative affect following the symptom self-ratings in the EG and a stable affect in the CG. The decline of negative affect was not moderated by the degree of health anxiety. Our findings might indicate that evaluating one's health status leads to a general reduction of negative affect in healthy individuals. The results of the study are in line with a bidirectional symptom perception model and underline the crucial role of affect regulation in the processing of health-related information.



FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Berking, Matthias Prof. Dr.
Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie


External institutions with authors

Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Universität Mannheim
Universität Salzburg (Paris Lodron Universität Salzburg)


How to cite

APA:
Jasper, F., Hiller, W., Berking, M., Rommel, T., & Witthofft, M. (2015). The affective response to health-related information and its relationship to health anxiety: An ambulatory approach. Cognition & Emotion, 29(4), 714-722. https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2014.930022

MLA:
Jasper, Fabian, et al. "The affective response to health-related information and its relationship to health anxiety: An ambulatory approach." Cognition & Emotion 29.4 (2015): 714-722.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2019-16-07 at 15:49