Treatment in a Center for Geriatric Traumatology

Beitrag in einer Fachzeitschrift


Details zur Publikation

Autor(en): Grund S, Roos M, Duchene W, Schuler M
Zeitschrift: Deutsches Ärzteblatt international
Jahr der Veröffentlichung: 2015
Band: 112
Heftnummer: 7
Seitenbereich: 113-119
ISSN: 1866-0452


Abstract


Although the number of elderly patients with fractures is increasing, there have been only a few studies to date of the efficacy of collaborative treatment by trauma surgeons and geriatricians.Data on patients over age 75 with femoral neck, trochanteric, proximal humeral, and pelvic ring fractures were evaluated from the eras before and after the establishment of a certified center for geriatric traumatology (CGT) (retrospective analysis, n = 169; prospective analysis, n = 216). Moreover, data were also analyzed from younger patients (aged 65-74) with the same types of fracture who were not treated in the CGT. The main outcome parameter was in-hospital mortality. Other ones were the frequency and length of stays in the intensive care unit, the overall length of hospital stay, and the use of inpatient rehabilitation after acute hospitalization.Before the CGT was established, 20.7% of all patients over age 75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.8-27%) were treated in an intensive care unit; the corresponding figure after the establishment of the CGT was 13.4% (95% CI, 9.3-18.5%, p = 0.057). The mean length of stay in the intensive care unit before and after establishment of the CGT was 48 hours (95% CI, 32-64 hours) and 53 hours (95% CI, 29-77 hours), respectively (p = 0.973). The in-hospital mortality declined from 9.5% (95% CI, 5.3-13.8%) to 6.5% (95% CI, 3.7-9.5%, p = 0.278), while the overall length of hospital stay increased from 13.7 days (95% CI, 12.6-14.8 days) to 16.9 days (95% CI, 16.1-17.7 days, pBefore the CGT was established, 20.7% of all patients over age 75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.8-27%) were treated in an intensive care unit; the corresponding figure after the establishment of the CGT was 13.4% (95% CI, 9.3-18.5%, p = 0.057). The mean length of stay in the intensive care unit before and after establishment of the CGT was 48 hours (95% CI, 32-64 hours) and 53 hours (95% CI, 29-77 hours), respectively (p = 0.973). The in-hospital mortality declined from 9.5% (95% CI, 5.3-13.8%) to 6.5% (95% CI, 3.7-9.5%, p = 0.278), while the overall length of hospital stay increased from 13.7 days (95% CI, 12.6-14.8 days) to 16.9 days (95% CI, 16.1-17.7 days, p<0.001). The percentage of patients transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility upon discharge decreased slightly, from 53.8% to 49.1%. Among the younger patients who were not treated in the CGT, no comparable trends were seen toward lower in-hospital mortality or toward less treatment in an intensive care unit. In fact, the developments over time in the younger age group tended to be in the opposite direction.0.001). The percentage of patients transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility upon discharge decreased slightly, from 53.8% to 49.1%. Among the younger patients who were not treated in the CGT, no comparable trends were seen toward lower in-hospital mortality or toward less treatment in an intensive care unit. In fact, the developments over time in the younger age group tended to be in the opposite direction.The collaborative treatment of elderly patients with fractures by trauma surgeons and geriatric physicians can markedly improve their acute care.



FAU-Autoren / FAU-Herausgeber

Roos, Marco Dr. med.
Allgemeinmedizinisches Institut


Autor(en) der externen Einrichtung(en)
Diakoniekrankenhaus Mannheim


Zitierweisen

APA:
Grund, S., Roos, M., Duchene, W., & Schuler, M. (2015). Treatment in a Center for Geriatric Traumatology. Deutsches Ärzteblatt international, 112(7), 113-119. https://dx.doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2015.0113

MLA:
Grund, Stefan, et al. "Treatment in a Center for Geriatric Traumatology." Deutsches Ärzteblatt international 112.7 (2015): 113-119.

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Zuletzt aktualisiert 2018-08-10 um 08:24