Microspar development during early marine burial diagenesis: A comparison of Pliocene carbonates from the Bahamas with Silurian limestones from Gotland (Sweden)

Journal article
(Original article)


Publication Details

Author(s): Munnecke A, Westphal H, Reijmer JJG, Samtleben C
Journal: Sedimentology
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Publication year: 1997
Volume: 44
Journal issue: 6
Pages range: 977-990
ISSN: 0037-0746


Abstract


Comparison of ultrastructures in Pliocene periplatform carbonates from the Bahamas with Silurian limestones from Gotland (Sweden) reveals that despite the differences in primary sediment composition and age, they reflect a similar mechanism of lithification. In both sequences calcite microspar was formed as a primary cement at an early stage of marine burial diagenesis. Neither significant compression nor meteoric influence are necessary for the formation of calcite microspar. A model is proposed for the process of microsparitic cementation of fine-grained aragonite needle muds comprising four stages: (1) unconsolidated, aragonite-dominated carbonate mud; (2) precipitation of microspar that engulfs aragonite needles; (3) dissolution of aragonite, resulting in pitted surfaces of the microspar crystals; and (4) slight recrystallization. Our results contradict the widespread opinion that microspar necessarily is a product of secondary recrystallization of a previously lithified micrite.



FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Munnecke, Axel Prof. Dr.
Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät


External institutions with authors

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) / University Amsterdam


How to cite

APA:
Munnecke, A., Westphal, H., Reijmer, J.J.G., & Samtleben, C. (1997). Microspar development during early marine burial diagenesis: A comparison of Pliocene carbonates from the Bahamas with Silurian limestones from Gotland (Sweden). Sedimentology, 44(6), 977-990. https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3091.1997.tb02173.x

MLA:
Munnecke, Axel, et al. "Microspar development during early marine burial diagenesis: A comparison of Pliocene carbonates from the Bahamas with Silurian limestones from Gotland (Sweden)." Sedimentology 44.6 (1997): 977-990.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2018-29-12 at 13:50