Testing the statistical association between family names and success in certain athletic disciplines in men called ‘Smith’ or ‘Tailor’

Journal article


Publication Details

Author(s): Stemmler MK, Bäumler G
Journal: Psychology Science
Publisher: Pabst Science Publishers
Publication year: 2003
Volume: 45
Journal issue: 2
Pages range: 254-262
ISSN: 1614-9947


Abstract


In respect to the medieval practice of giving surnames based on ones profession and based on the hereditary transmission from generation to generation, Bäumler (1980) suggested a genetic-social theory of assortative distribution of traits of body build such as height, weight, and stature in a population of men called ‘Smith’ (German: Schmied) and ‘Tailor’ (German: Schneider). From this theory the hypothesis was deduced that among the top ranking athletes of the ‘heavy weight’ branches of athletics, which require body strength and body height, there are relatively more persons that go by the name of Schmied than in the ‘light weight’ branches of athletics, which are more stamina demanding, where more persons go by the name of Schneider. At the same time, complementary hypotheses assuming less Schneiders among the heavy weight branches than expected and less Schmieds among the light branches of athletics than expected under the null hypothesis of no statistical association were also tested. All hypotheses were empirically supported by applying the data of two independent samples.




Additional Organisation
Lehrstuhl für Psychologische Diagnostik, Methodenlehre und Rechtspsychologie


External institutions
Technische Universität München (TUM)


How to cite

APA:
Stemmler, M.K., & Bäumler, G. (2003). Testing the statistical association between family names and success in certain athletic disciplines in men called ‘Smith’ or ‘Tailor’. Psychology Science, 45(2), 254-262.

MLA:
Stemmler, Mark Kurt, and Günther Bäumler. "Testing the statistical association between family names and success in certain athletic disciplines in men called ‘Smith’ or ‘Tailor’." Psychology Science 45.2 (2003): 254-262.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2018-07-08 at 04:08