Culturally sensitive public health makes a difference: The HIV/AIDS disaster and beyond

Article in Edited Volumes


Publication Details

Author(s): Krüger F, Geiselhart K, Schmitz P
Editor(s): IFRC
Title edited volumes: World Disasters Report 2014. Focus on culture and risk
Publishing place: Genf
Publication year: 2014
Pages range: 152-183
ISBN: 978-92-9139-214-8


Abstract


Cultures perceived as integral parts of fields of practices, as commitments, agendas

and actions, may coexist in a local setting, but not necessarily in harmony.

They may collide, or be contested or ignored, and people or organizations whose

actions are framed by different cultures might suffer from the consequences of

these contests. The example of HIV/AIDS-related research in Botswana is used to

explain the implications this has for public health and to illustrate the perspective,

in this chapter, of culture and health. Many individuals who work in public

health and in disaster management, or who are directly affected by calamitous

health-related events, have observed that, in public health and humanitarian

assistance evolving around HIV/AIDS, local nurses and other medical personnel

have a good understanding of the needs and hardship of those living with HIV and

AIDS. They are, however, often restricted in their actions by conditions governed

at higher levels of their institutions.



FAU Authors / FAU Editors

Geiselhart, Klaus Dr.
Institut für Geographie
Krüger, Fred Prof. Dr.
Professur für Geographie


How to cite

APA:
Krüger, F., Geiselhart, K., & Schmitz, P. (2014). Culturally sensitive public health makes a difference: The HIV/AIDS disaster and beyond. In IFRC (Eds.), World Disasters Report 2014. Focus on culture and risk (pp. 152-183). Genf.

MLA:
Krüger, Fred, Klaus Geiselhart, and Peter Schmitz. "Culturally sensitive public health makes a difference: The HIV/AIDS disaster and beyond." World Disasters Report 2014. Focus on culture and risk Ed. IFRC, Genf, 2014. 152-183.

BibTeX: 

Last updated on 2018-07-08 at 01:57